Mentoring Library
Text

M5_4 Hierarchy of Values & Mentoring Arrangement

Lesson 4

Discuss -> Use the hierarchy of values approach to support the mentoring arrangement:

Suggested Actions ... based on answering this question:

"Can you discuss -> use the hierarchy of values approach to support the mentoring arrangement?"

If yes - move to the next lesson or module

If no - follow this pathway

1. Watch the videos

2. Identify 3-5 Key Learning Points from watching each video

3. Read the Notes and Additional Resources below - if available

4. Summarize your learning

5. Confirm you can answer the question with "Yes"


Use the Comment section below - Public message

Use this link for a Private message via the website Contact Form


Notes

Define values:

  • the regard that something is held to deserve; the importance, worth, or usefulness of something.
  • a person's principles or standards of behavior; one's judgment of what is important in life.

Define hierarchy of values:

  • It refers to an ordered list of social values that influence judicial decision-making.
  • Physiological, Safety, Love/Belonging, Esteem, and Self-Actualization

List the main elements of a personal hierarchy of values:

  • Physiological, Safety, Love/Belonging, Esteem, and Self-Actualization

Identify the value to the mentor in knowing the mentee’s hierarchy of values:

  • Knowing and understanding what is important in life to the mentee would be a great asset in building the trusted relationship.
  • Each relationship is unique and knowing the hierarchy of values would help in the customizing of the experience for the mentee.

Identify the value to the mentee in knowing the mentor’s hierarchy of values:

  • Where the most value would come into play would be in the selection of a mentor
  • Knowing a mentor’s hierarchy of values could assist in finding the right match

Demonstrate the simulated use of the hierarchy of values approach to support the mentoring arrangement:

  • This five-stage model can be divided into deficiency needs and growth needs. The first four levels are often referred to as deficiency needs (D-needs), and the top level is known as growth or being needs (B-needs).
  • Deficiency needs arise due to deprivation and are said to motivate people when they are unmet. Also, the motivation to fulfill such needs will become stronger the longer the duration they are denied. For example, the longer a person goes without food, the more hungry they will become.
Powered by Thrive Apprentice
Pen
>